WELCOME TO STILLZINSEL
 
 
 
Thank You for stopping by! We have combined their obsessive attention to detail with their principle design aesthetic of less is more, to offer custom framing services to the upstate community.
For four generations, our family's history has been intertwined with fine art & framing. Family members have practiced both, from Germany to Philadelphia to South Carolina to New Orleans to New York City, and now another chapter begins in Livingston Manor! We look forward to sharing our enthusiasm and knowledge when the time comes for you to consider preserving an object with custom framing!
 
     
     
 
PRESERVATION
Preserving an object that is framed using appropriate archival materials is a straight- forward process.
Here is an example of thoughtful consideration in preparing an object for as long of a life as technically possible.
When designing a traditional or float frame for a canvas or panel, the first consideration is the frame depth. Does the face of the frame rise above the surface? A frame face that rises slightly above the art and media will protect both in terms of handling.
It is critical to the preservation of a canvas that it be correctly installed into a frame. Making sure the frame has been given an appropriate allowance will help protect the canvas as it contracts and expands throughout its life. Do not drill, nail or screw into the back of the canvas to secure to a frame. Offsets are employed for a pressure fit.
 
The appropriate protection to the back of an exposed canvas is Coroplast Archival, a chemically inert and additive-free, archival-grade corrugated plastic that will protect from accidental damage.
As with all previously framed objects, it is appropriate to remove labels and information from a previous frame back, and/or backboard and archivally package and transfer to the new frame backboard, maintaining visual documentation of the history of the object.
With a new object, documentation of the back of the object, an image, and noted provenance, a document, would be printed and placed either in an envelope attached to the frame backboard or directly adhered to the frame backboard.
Below are suggested objects and how they might be prepared for as long of a life as technically possible.
 
     
     
 
Sisters, c. 1840, oil on canvas, is displayed as framed with several commercial mouldings that have been stacked and then distressed by hand. In most cases, when fitting a painting into a frame, the edge of painting will be protected by an acrylic felt lining adhered to the rabbet surface that touches the painting surface or edge-strips made of 100% cotton rag board and wrapped around the canvas, projecting above the surface of painting if the artist used an impasto technique.
 
     
     
 
This Samuel Howitt drawing, Two Chinese Pigs, on wove paper (paper made on a wire-gauze mesh so as to have a uniform unlined surface) is displayed as framed with a commercial moulding that has been distressed by hand. UV filtering acrylic or glass, acid and Lignin-free 100% cotton rag backboard and handmade (using the same material and color as the backboard) rag spacers would be the material list for this project. The drawing is floating on the backboard; this would require folded hinges made of an appropriate Japanese paper and methyl cellulose. The rag spacers would lift the glazing above the drawing surface for preservation considerations.  
 
     
     
 
A Vincent van Gogh painting, Self-Portrait, 1889, on canvas displayed as a reproduction printed on canvas framed with a commercial moulding that recreates a 17th century Dutch ebonized ripple profile.  
 
     
     
 
Here an original and historic postcard is displayed as framed with a custom closed corner splined maple frame hand finished with an ebony stain. UV filtering acrylic or glass, acid and Lignin-free 100% cotton rag matting and backboard would be the material list for this project. The postcard would be held in place with handmade acid-free corner pockets adhered to the backboard using an appropriate Japanese paper and acid-free linen tape. (nothing is attached directly to the object when using acid-free corner pockets) The rag matting would lift the glazing above the drawing surface for preservation considerations.  
 
     
     
 
The Artist's Sister, Edma, with Her Daughter, Jeanne, watercolor over graphite on laid paper by Berthe Morisot is displayed as framed in a Badura-inspired reproduction antique frame with a gold engraved panel enhancing the hand crafted dental design around the perimeter. UV filtering and anti reflection Optium acrylic or Museum glass, acid and Lignin-free 100% cotton rag backboard and handmade (using the same material and color as the backboard) rag spacers would be the material list for this project. The watercolor is floating on the backboard; this would require folded hinges made of an appropriate Japanese paper and methyl cellulose. The rag spacers would lift the glazing above the drawing surface for preservation considerations. 
 
     
   
 
This oil on canvas, Portrait of an Elderly Lady, by Mary Cassatt is displayed in an original late 19th century American gilt composition frame with raised grille panel designed by Stanford White.
 
     
     
 
From the Balthazar Korab Collection, a 4x5 inch transparency, Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia, 1958-63 (Expanded by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1998-2000) Exterior, is displayed as a printed photograph framed in a commercial hardwood stained moulding. UV filtering acrylic or glass, acid and Lignin-free 100% cotton rag matting and backboard would be the material list for this project. A photograph printed from the transparency would be held in place with handmade acid-free corner pockets adhered to the backboard using an appropriate Japanese paper and acid-free linen tape. (nothing is attached directly to the object when using acid-free corner pockets) The rag matting would lift the glazing above the drawing surface for preservation considerations.
 
     
     
 
Displayed as an original WPA poster, A book Mark Would Be Better, the suggested frame is a custom closed corner Padauk frame hand finished with multiple coats of Tung oil. UV filtering acrylic or glass, acid and Lignin-free 100% cotton rag matting and backboard would be the material list for this project. The poster would be held in place with handmade acid-free corner pockets adhered to the backboard using an appropriate Japanese paper and acid-free linen tape. (nothing is attached directly to the object when using acid-free corner pockets) The rag matting would lift the glazing above the drawing surface for preservation considerations.
 
     
     
 
     
 
Thank You for stopping by, we appreciate your interest.
Questions? We are happy to help!
 
 
     
 
     
 
StillZinsel
90 Main Street
Livingston Manor, NY
845-707-1189
m@stillzinsel.com
 
     
 
     
 
Open
by appointment
or by chance
 
 
 
     
 
     
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